THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO CREMATION PLANNING - Afterlife Funerals
loader image
THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO CREMATION PLANNING

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO CREMATION PLANNING

While cremations are not a traditional mode of funeral ceremony, they have recently surpassed burials as the prefered way of final disposition in Australia. They have also become the prefered alternative in other western countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom.
Around 75% of funerals in Australia are cremations, whereas 22% of the nation’s deaths result in direct cremation (a cremation without an accompanying funeral service). And these tendencies are accelerating each year.
Despite the trend away from burials, many people are unfamiliar with the cremation process and the disposition of the ashes. This Comprehensive Guide to Cremation provides an in-depth overview of the procedure. It addresses frequently asked issues concerning cremations in order to assist you and your family in making the best decision possible when considering a cremation.
This guide is divided into the sections below:
1. What factors influence people’s decision to choose cremation?
2. What is the cost of cremation?
3. What exactly is cremation?
4. What happens when someone dies?
5. What exactly is a death certificate and how do I obtain one?
6. Ashes and cremated remains
7. Memorials following cremation
8. How do I pay for my cremation in advance?
9. Frequently Asked Cremation Questions

PART 1: WHAT CAUSES PEOPLE TO CHOOSE CREMATION?
When someone dies, they have the option of burial or cremation, and ultimately, this is a question of personal preference.
Today, around 75% of fatalities are cremated, and the rate is increasing at a rate of about 1% each year. While cremations vary by state and territory, metropolitan and regional areas, cremations are significantly more prevalent in urban areas, according to funeral industry statistics.
Land is scarcer and more expensive in urban areas, limiting burials as a viable alternative. While there is a significant reason cremations are surpassing burials, the biggest reason is a generational shift in the “customer” of funeral services. People nowadays are more cost aware, less devout, and less conventional, and as a result, more people than ever are saying goodbye to traditional funerals and, by extension, graves. There are a variety of factors that contribute to this trend.

AVOID RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS
The Christian religion was once a significant impact on Australian funeral rituals, but by the start of the twentieth century, Christianity’s practise had declined significantly. While family and religious traditions remain significant to certain people, modern culture is gradually moving away from traditionalism. As the nation moves towards secularism, Australians are adopting new customs in place of religious rites. As a result, many people are opting for cremation over conventional burial when it comes to death.

CREMATION’S ECONOMIC BENEFITS
Another aspect contributing to cremation’s popularity is affordability, since cremation can be up to four times less expensive than burial. This may come as a surprise to many, but the average cost of a funeral in Australia is approximately $7,499, and it is steadily increasing each year. According to the government’s Moneysmart website, private funerals normally cost between $4,000 and $15,000 for a simple cremation and up to $15,000 for a more ornate burial.
Additionally, in a handful of Australian jurisdictions, burial interments are limited to 25 or 50 years. This means that a family member will be able to renew the licence for an additional period – but at a cost. Cremations are significantly less expensive than burials, making them considerably more affordable for many families.

THE ABILITY TO ‘GO YOUR OWN WAY’
Memorialization through creativity and personalisation is a growing trend, with families seeking new ways to honour their loved one’s life beyond the usual graveside service and burial. Cremation gives families the opportunity and flexibility to tailor a loved one’s funeral service and subsequent ashes scattering ceremony to their distinctive personality. We’ll discuss this further later.

REMAINING CONNECTED TO FAMILY AND FRIENDS
Family members may be dispersed throughout the country, residing in a variety of cities, making it more difficult for many to visit family burial grounds. When the time comes, parents frequently battle with the decision of whether to be buried near their own parents or their children. As cremation becomes more widespread, the requirement for permanent physical placing of remains appears to diminish in importance.
Cremation enables the remains to be buried alongside other family members and loved ones, or spread in a location more meaningful to your loved one than a cemetery. Additionally, they can be maintained in an urn, giving family members with a permanent remembrance of their loved one.

FUNERAL IMPACTS ON THE ENVIRONMENT
The ecological impact of mortality is also becoming more of a factor, as people become more aware of the importance of conserving nature for future generations.
CO2 emissions: While cremation produces around four times the amount of carbon dioxide produced by a burial, the process actually has a lesser carbon footprint than burials due to cemetery upkeep activities such as irrigation and fertilising, according to Gatheredhere.com.au. Cremations are considered to be between 10% and 50% more environmentally friendly than burials due to the accompanying impacts of burial.
Production of coffins: Each year, the amount of wood required to manufacture caskets is astonishing, with over 1.6 million hectares of forest being felled for this purpose. Additionally, the casket manufacturing process contributes to pollution. In recent years, cardboard coffins have gained popularity as an eco-friendly option for cremation.
Pollution: Embalming fluid is another source of pollution. When chemicals are buried in the ground, they do not simply vanish; they slowly infiltrate the soil and underground waterways. According to the Smithsonian Magazine, an average four-hectare cemetery has enough embalming fluid to fill a small swimming pool.
Land availability: A key issue, particularly in cities, is a lack of available space. Those concerned about land scarcity are opting for cremation rather than contributing to the problem by burying their loved ones in a cemetery. According to The Guardian, a UK study anticipated that London’s cemeteries will be totally full within the next 20-30 years. Australia, many believe, will not be far behind.

PART 2: WHAT IS THE COST OF A CREMATION? THE COST OF A FUNERAL IN EACH STATE
The cost of a funeral varies by state and service venue. Prices may vary due to the fact that the cost of crematorium use, transportation, and required paperwork varies by state. Due to several of these variables, the price is often greater in regional locations.
According to Finder.com.au, the average cost of a traditional funeral ceremony in each state is as follows.
Please keep in mind that these data average the costs of burials and cremations, and hence are skewed towards expensive burials. We shall discuss cremation costs in further detail in the section that follows.
According to Finder.com.au, the average cost of a funeral (burial and cremation) is:
• Average funeral cost in Sydney: $8,357 • Average funeral cost in Brisbane: $7,505 • Average funeral cost in Perth: $7,584
• Average funeral cost in Adelaide: $7,114 • Average funeral cost in Hobart: $6,832

STATE-BY-STATE COST OF CREMATION
The data above represent the national average for funeral costs by state. The average values are slightly distorted by high-cost burials, with cremations costing far less on average.
According to Gatheredhere.com.au, the following is an approximate cost range for a basic cremation in each capital city (including funeral director costs and use of a chapel). Please keep in mind that costs will vary between individual funeral homes:
• Melbourne: between $4,400 and $7,900
• Sydney: between $5,440 and $9,230
• ACT: between $6,600 and $8,600
• Brisbane: between $4,380 and $7,690
• Perth: between $4,600 and $6,300
• Adelaide: between $3,000 and $7,800

WHAT ARE YOU PURCHASING?
A funeral service’s cost is composed of several unique components.
To begin, the most significant cost associated with engaging a funeral home for a traditional funeral is the funeral director’s professional service fee, according to a University of Wollongong research of the funeral industry’s openness. This typically includes coordination with service suppliers, vehicle maintenance, and normal business expenses such as labour expenditures.
The second factor is the price of a coffin, which contains a high markup that can often surpass 100% of the actual cost, according to the report.
The third component is used for general expenditures. These include both fixed and variable costs associated with additional items such as flowers, death certificates, and cemetery or crematorium fees that are passed on to the consumer.
CREMATION DIRECT – A CHEAP FUNERAL OPTION
A direct cremation, on the other hand, is a substantially less expensive choice. Due to the absence of a ceremony or a funeral director, you are typically merely charged for the usage of a cremation. Typically, a basic coffin is chosen rather than a pricey wooden casket, which also helps keep costs low. Additionally, you save paying for a celebrant, catering, flowers, and numerous modes of transportation, all of which can be rather costly.
In Australia, the typical cost of a direct cremation — that is, cremation without an attended ceremony – is roughly $4000, but additional fees for after-hours callouts and other services are frequently charged. As a low-cost cremation service, Bare’s nationwide average pricing for an immediate-need cremation is approximately $2,100 at the time of writing. The cost varies by state and location due to major regional differences in transportation, storage, and Crematory fees. However, there are no additional expenses associated with 24/7 collection or after-hours customer care and support with Bare.

WHAT IS A CREMATION, PART 3?
Cremation, as an alternative to burial, is the process of burning the body to reduce the human remains to extremely small bone pieces referred to as ashes or “cremated remains.”
Generally, the decision to choose cremation over burial is determined by the deceased’s family or Next of Kin. Often, the decision is taken well in advance of death, and the deceased may have communicated their desires to their family. In some circumstances, arrangements, including pre-paying services, may already be in place.
Your funeral director will be able to arrange for any cremation-related services. This involves receiving the deceased and keeping and preparing the body; completing relevant papers; arranging the cremation; supplying the coffin; and coordinating the return of the ashes. A funeral director can also arrange for a chapel service in lieu of a direct cremation for a memorial or committal service.
While the cremation process is basically the same, there are some variants available:
CREMATION IN THE TRADITION
A traditional cremation is organised by a funeral director and entails a formal ceremony preceding the cremation itself. It may also include a viewing of the corpse prior to the funeral service.
CREATION DIRECTLY
A direct cremation, commonly referred to as a bare cremation, is a cremation that occurs without a formal funeral service. The no-frills cremation eliminates the need for a funeral planner, occurs without a viewing, and enables families to construct a bespoke memorial service following the cremation.
CREMATION IN PRIVACY
A private cremation or “cremation only” is another phrase for a straight cremation or cremation without service. Typically, the family arranges a private gathering or memorial following the cremation and receipt of the ashes.
CREATION BY DIRECTION VS. CREATION BY TRADITIONAL MEANS
Direct cremation is Australia’s fastest rising funeral trend, owing to its inexpensive cost in comparison to a traditional funeral. According to Gatheredhere.com.au’s research, direct cremation accounts for approximately 23% of total funerals – up from an estimated 5% just ten years ago. Numerous factors contribute to this unexpected surge in popularity, including cost, customisation, and convenience.
Three significant distinctions exist between direct cremation and traditional cremation:
A. THE COMMUNITY MEMORIAL SERVICE
A funeral service is typically held at the crematorium prior to the cremation in a traditional cremation. A funeral director will arrange for this event.
However, with direct cremation, the memorial service occurs without the presence of the deceased, typically after the ashes have been delivered to the family. The memorial, celebration of life, or ashes scattering ceremony is typically organised by the deceased’s family and can take place anywhere, including your house, a pub, a favourite restaurant, or a natural location.
B. FEES FOR CREMATION
A cremation without a ceremony enables families to arrange for the cremation of a loved one simply and economically, without incurring the cost or administration associated with consulting a funeral director. As a result, direct cremations are frequently considerably less expensive than traditional funerals. The primary reason a Bare Cremation is less expensive is that a standard cremation includes the services of a funeral director, which means that families will pay a premium for items like as the coffin, urn, flowers, and a wake if one is organised through the funeral parlour.

C. AN INDIVIDUAL FAREWELL
When a family arranges for a standard cremation through a funeral home, the family is typically offered the choice of customising various aspects of the event, such as the casket, urn, flowers, music, and readings. The ceremony must be held at the crematorium.
While arranging a straight cremation leaves limited room for customization, personalisation occurs once the ashes are received. The family is thus allowed to design a memorial ceremony that is meaningful for their loved one, rather than following a funeral director’s script.
If a family so desires, we can connect them with one of our specialised memorial celebrants who can assist them in planning and facilitating a memorial ceremony.

PART 4: WHAT HAPPENS WHEN SOMEONE DIES?
The initial cremation process is typically determined by the location of the deceased.
If a person dies in a hospital or other institution, a staff member will typically contact a funeral director immediately to inform them of the person’s death and to supply the funeral director with the Next of Kin’s information. Following that, the funeral director will contact the Next of Kin to discuss the procedure and to address any concerns they may have. The funeral director will next contact the hospital or institution to arrange for the deceased’s transfer to their care.
If your loved one died at home, you must contact a funeral home immediately after a medical professional confirms their death. The funeral director will next arrange for the care and transportation of your loved one to the morgue while all relevant paperwork is gathered and completed correctly. While state laws vary slightly, the Next of Kin is normally required to submit an Application for Cremation as well as a Registration of Death Information form. Additionally, the funeral director compiles all relevant medical paperwork. After processing the paperwork, the body is sent to the Crematory.
If you are planning a formal committal service, your funeral director will coordinate the event with you and your family.
Following the funeral service, the majority of crematoriums will delay cremation until all mourners have left. Cremations are legally required in Australia to occur within 48 hours following the funeral service, but they typically occur on the day of the service.
When a direct cremation is requested, the deceased is transported directly to the Crematory and cremated prior to any memorial service. Unless you specifically want not to know, your funeral company should contact you to inform you of the cremation date. With a direct cremation, the family or close friends are responsible for planning their own memorial or celebration of life at a later date and location that is most convenient for them.

WHAT IS THE DURATION OF A CREMATION FUNERAL SERVICE?
A typical cremation funeral ceremony is comparable to a burial service, but without the cemetery component. The length of a cremation service varies according to the activities chosen for the event, but usually last between 30 and 60 minutes. Consult your funeral director if you wish to arrange for a longer service; however, this will frequently incur an additional charge.

A FUNERAL ORDER OF SERVICE IS WHAT?
The sequence of services details the various components of the funeral. The order of service is typically provided in the form of a brochure that informs mourners of what will occur throughout the funeral. It typically includes information about any songs, prayers, or readings.
A funeral ceremony typically includes a eulogy, poetry or readings, music, and, more recently, the addition of photographs or films of the departed to commemorate their life. The service will conclude with a commitment — the deceased’s official farewell before being buried or transferred to be cremated.
If the dead attends the service, the coffin is typically put on a trolley or a platform called a catafalque prior to the arrival of mourners.
The coffin is removed following the committal service. Each cremation handles this differently — the coffin may be covered from view by drapes shutting around it, or it may be dropped into the crematorium or transported through a gateway. Occasionally, after the conclusion of a service, the family may like to carry or wheel the coffin to the hearse and observe it depart. The mourners exit the chapel once the casket is hidden from view.
The funeral director will make arrangements for the coffin’s transportation to the Crematory. This information will be provided immediately by the funeral director’s mortuary facility or by the chapel or church where the service was held.

WHAT CAN YOU USE TO CREATE A COFFIN?
Anything except glass or a battery-operated gadget – such as a phone, radio, or pacemaker – may be placed in a coffin for cremation. Occasionally, families like to include flowers, soft toys, and handwritten messages on paper and cards inside their loved one’s cremation casket, and this is acceptable.
However, it is preferable not to leave jewellery, rings, or watches on the body, as these items will not be included in the ashes sent to the family and cannot be retrieved following the cremation procedure. If an item of jewellery holds sentimental value, it is preferable to keep it.

CAN CREMATED PERSONS WITH PACEMAKERS?
Yes, those who have pacemakers can be cremated. Pacemakers and other mechanical devices including batteries, on the other hand, must be removed beforehand due to the presence of combustible compounds that may explode when subjected to severe heat. Pins, screws, and joints all stay in place.
It is critical to inform your funeral planner if the dead possessed a pacemaker, prosthesis, or any other type of medical device.

ARE ORGANS EXTRACTED PRIOR TO CREMATION?
Generally, organs are not removed prior to cremation unless they are being donated.
Your loved one may have already made the decision to donate their organs or you may be requested to do so for qualified organ transplant patients. If this is the case, the Next of Kin must consent to the operation before it may proceed. This is a decision that you may have to make soon upon their death.
Organ and tissue donation have no impact on funeral arrangements, according to Australia’s organ donation register Donate Life. Cremation can still go place without requiring any alterations to the service. This article contains additional information regarding organ and body donation.

HOW IS THE BODY READY FOR RESURRECTION?
To prepare a body for cremation, any things that could obstruct the cremation process are removed (such as pacemakers, as discussed previously). After that, the deceased is placed in a coffin that will remain sealed throughout the cremation procedure.

WHAT OCCURES DURING A CREMATION?
When the cremation procedure is set to begin, the nameplate on the coffin is compared to the cremation order to ensure that the coffin bears the correct identification. The coffin is accompanied by a card that contains all necessary information and will remain with it until the family’s ashes are returned.
The cremator is a cubicle that can hold only one standard-sized coffin. Its chamber is heated to between 800 and 1000 degrees Fahrenheit. It is constructed of heat-resistant bricks, and the heat generated by the bricks causes the cremation to occur.
If the coffin contains any metal components, such as handles, they are removed. The casket is subsequently slid into the cremator, with the deceased placed feet first. After the body and casket are entirely incinerated, the cremated remains are put in a cooling tray. Any metallic components, such as coffin nails, are removed and the resulting residue is allowed to cool.
Finally, the cremated ashes are pulverised into fine, sand-like particles. These ashes are then placed in a sealed container or an urn purchased in advance by the deceased’s family. On the Bare Cremation website, you may learn more about the numerous urn alternatives.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO CREATE?
The time required for cremation is dependent on a variety of parameters, including body mass, bone density, and the materials used to construct the casket. While it takes approximately two hours to reduce a human body to ashes, the full cremation procedure, including preparation, takes approximately three hours.

ASHES RETURN
Following the cremation, your funeral provider will arrange for the most appropriate method of delivering your loved one’s ashes to the individual who initiated the cremation application. Typically, ashes can be picked up in person or delivered.

PART 5: DEATH CERTIFICATES: WHAT ARE THEY AND HOW DO I APPLY FOR ONE
Your loved one’s death must be registered, and an official death certificate will be provided by the Office of Births, Deaths, and Marriages. Each state in Australia has its own set of guidelines on how the Next of Kin should register a death; however, your funeral service provider will normally handle this for you.

WHY AM I REQUIRED TO OBTAIN A DEATH CERTIFICATE?
A death certificate is required prior to the administration of a will. Typically, a death certificate is also required to cancel debts, bank accounts, and utilities, as well as to handle other aspects of the estate.

HOW DO I OBTAIN A DEATH CERTIFICATE?
If you have ordered for cremation with Bare, we will send you the death certificate and four certified copies via Express Post.
We normally recommend a two- to three-week wait period following cremation. It may take longer at times if the state authority’s processing is delayed.

PART SIX: CREMATED RESIDUES AND ASHES HOW IS A CREMATORIUM DEFINED?
Cremations take place in crematoriums, which are typically found within cemeteries. Throughout the country, there are a number of crematoriums, both public and private. The cost of cremation varies significantly amongst crematoriums, depending on the location and funeral provider.

WHEN WILL THE ASHES BE RECEIVED BY THE FAMILY?
Allow one week from the date of cremation for the return of cremated remains or ashes to the Next of Kin.

THE ASHES ARE RETURNED IN WHAT MANNER?
Following cremation, the cremated remains may be collected from the Crematory. With a Bare Cremation, families have the option of collecting the remains in person or having them shipped.
If specified, cremated remains may be stored at a crematorium. If the cremated remains are not claimed within a reasonable time period, often 12 months, the Crematory may dispose of them in any manner it deems acceptable — typically interred on the cemetery grounds.

HOW CAN I BE SURE I WILL RECEIVE THE CORRECT ASHES?
The obligation is taken very seriously, and the Australian Government tightly regulates the process. At any given time, just one casket is incinerated.
Prior to cremation, an identification number is assigned and imprinted on a metal plate; this number then travels with your loved one throughout the cremation process, ensuring that we never lose track of who is who.

AFTER CREMATION, WHAT HAPPENS TO THE REMAINS?
Once the remains have been retrieved, a few choices are available. Ashes can be buried in a cemetery, in a tiny plot, or in a columbarium or niche wall; they can be preserved in a stylish urn and stored at home or at a favourite spot; or they can be scattered in a location meaningful to the deceased and their families. This is most frequently done on private property, or at a beach, river, public park, or sea.

When deciding what to do with your loved one’s cremated remains, you’ll want to consider the future in a way that preserves their individuality for you. Consider if you want a permanent memorial space that you and other family members may visit, or whether spreading your loved one’s ashes in a special location is more fitting for their memory.
Ashes cannot be recovered once they have been dispersed, so take your time in making the best decision for you now and in the future. Consider future access to the site, which may become restricted for a variety of reasons. Consider the consequences of dispersing in the backyard if the property is sold or vacated in the future.
Additionally, consider whether other family members wish to keep a portion of the ashes. There is no requirement that remains be kept together, and they may be split for various individuals and purposes.

MEMORIAL PARKS AND CEMETERIES
Cremated remains can be interred in a variety of ways at memorial parks.
You may like to acquire a cremation memorial, which may take the form of a niche in a wall or garden bed. Each cemetery offers a variety of options, and you should contact the cemetery directly to enquire about their offerings and price. Scattering of ashes is permitted in cemetery gardens; however, you must contact the cemetery for details and fees.

ARE YOU REQUIRED TO GET PERMISSION TO SCATTER THE ASHES?
Each state and territory has its own set of regulations, so you’ll need to determine which ones apply in your area. Scattering ashes may violate the provisions of your state’s environmental statute regarding air or water pollution. As a general rule, it is prudent to obtain permission from private landowners or the local government for parks, beaches, and playing fields.
Councils and other government entities may also establish a time and location for these events and impose additional conditions. Without the authorisation of proper authorities, disposing of ashes may result in legal action being brought against the individual disposing of the ashes, so it’s critical to check if limits exist in your state.

GENERAL SCATTERING ADVICE
If scattering persists, keep the following points in mind to make the experience a little bit easier and more pleasant for everyone:
Consider the container in which the relics are contained. Containers from the cremation are frequently difficult to open (typically requiring the removal of a stopper with a flat screwdriver) and also difficult to scatter from. Ascertain that you understand how to open the receptacle prior to the moment of scattering. Alternatively, transfer the remains to a container built expressly for dispersing remains, such as the Eco Scattering Urn.
When scattering remains, keep an eye on the direction of the wind. Maintain an upwind position for guests to avoid any flying debris blowing towards family or friends.
Consider other individuals. If you’re scattering in a public space, keep in mind that other people have a right to be there as well. Be kind and, if necessary, discrete. Choose a time and location that are free of heavy crowds.

THE SCATTERING OF ASHES BY THE SEA
Before scattering ashes at sea by boat, you must obtain permission from the vessel’s or boat’s master. Ships can be rented particularly for the purpose of scattering ashes.
There are also additional measures to take when scattering remains at sea.
• Pre-loosen the container’s lid or pre-drill large holes to make it simpler to remove the cover or scatter the ashes while on board a vessel; • Consider the wind direction and scatter near the water if possible; and • Never simply throw the container overboard as it will float. Empty the container’s contents into the water at all times.

TRAVELING IN CONNECTION WITH ASHES
Following cremation, you may choose to transport the cremated remains to another state or country. You may be returning your loved one home for a memorial service or scattering them in a particular holiday location.
Traveling with ashes is unquestionably permitted. There are no legal regulations regarding the export of cremated remains from Australia. Our guide to travelling with ashes includes helpful hints for a stress-free journey.

PART 7: MEMORIALS AFTER DEATH
Cremations allow families to hold a traditional funeral ceremony before to the cremation if desired, but there are also countless ways to commemorate your loved one’s life following the cremation.

LIFE CELEBRATION
An end-of-life service is a means for you to express gratitude to someone remarkable for their one-of-a-kind life. It is one of the final physical gestures you may perform for another person to ensure their life is acknowledged and remembered. Rather of a typical service, families and close friends may wish to organise a celebration-of-life by gathering for supper at their loved one’s favourite restaurant or by hosting a backyard barbeque. Alternatively, you may organise a meeting at your loved one’s favourite natural location – such as a barbeque by the beach, a memorial in a park, or any particular location that meant a great deal to your loved one.
Additionally, ashes dispersal ceremonies might be included as part of the monument. At Bare, we’ve witnessed families gather for sunset ashes scattering ceremonies in scenic locations such as mountains, seaside, and lakeside. We even had a Viking farewell! Consider sprinkling ashes from a hot air balloon.
Additionally, you can read our post about ashes memorials for additional ideas. Additionally, we’ve included some music choices in this post for songs to play during your loved one’s memorial service. Additionally, we’ve compiled a Spotify playlist.

GROW A PERMANENT MEMORY
Growing a lovely remembrance tree, plant, or flowers from a loved one’s cremated remains can assist to perpetuate their memory. Following the memorial service, a biodegradable Living Urn with roots or seeds may be planted in the ground to allow a specific tree or shrub to grow in honour of your dearly departed.

SEND-OFF AT THE SEA
Another alternative is to bid your loved one farewell with a water-based cremation service on a beach or lake. A biodegradable Eco Water Urn can be set in any body of water and will naturally float away with the tides, allowing you to create the ideal ceremony in nature.

PART 8: HOW DO I PREPARE FOR MY DEATH?
If you believe you will want to be cremated when the time comes, you may wish to prepay your cremation. Pre-planned funerals give you control over what happens after your death and can alleviate emotional and financial strain on surviving family members.
We pride ourselves on providing superior customer service at an affordable price with no hidden expenses.

PART 9: COMMON QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT CREMATIONS

WHAT SHOULD I DO AFTER A LOVED ONE PASSES AWAY?
The first step after a death is to contact a funeral home.
Your dedicated support person will gather some basic information, walk you through the process, and address any concerns you may have. From there, your funeral director will begin arranging for the pickup and transportation of your loved one, as well as initiating the necessary paperwork.

WHO DO I HAVE TO NOTIFY ABOUT THE DEATH OF SOMEONE?
There are several institutions and individuals you should contact to ensure that an individual’s estate is properly closed. To get started, please refer to our Estate Planning Guide for Victoria or our Estate Planning Guide for NSW.

HOW LONG DOES COLLECTION TAKE?
The timing of collection is determined on the location of the passing. If your loved one has died at home, we will make every effort to arrive within two hours. If they died in an aged care facility or hospital, we will collect their remains as quickly as feasible, subject to the availability of the hospital or aged care home. If your loved one is taken to the Coroner, we will collect your loved one after the Coroner’s investigation is complete, which can take up to a week.

WHERE ARE THE DECEASED REMAINING?
Typically, once the corpse is placed in the care of the funeral provider, he or she is transferred to a morgue.

HOW LONG DOES THE PROCESS TAKE FROM ASH COLLECTION TO ASH RETURN?
We normally encourage families to allow ten days from the time the ashes are collected to the time they are returned. However, this can vary based on the speed with which family documents is provided, as well as relevant approvals from institutions (hospitals, coroners etc.). The delivery or return of ashes may also have an effect on the timing, depending on the type of return chosen.

THE ASHES ARE RETURNED IN WHAT MANNER?
According to your location, ashes are returned in a variety of ways. They can be delivered personally, made available for pickup, or sent via registered mail or a courier service. Your funeral director will discuss your delivery alternatives with you.

CAN I AVOID RETURNING THE ASHES?
You have the option of not having the ashes returned. Your funeral director can arrange for the scattering of your ashes in a cemetery on your behalf; however, this will require formal authorisation and, in many cases, the cemetery will charge for this service.

HOW CAN I BE SURE I WILL RECEIVE THE CORRECT ASHES?
We take this obligation extremely seriously, and the Australian Government strictly regulates the method through which this occurs. Prior to cremation, an identification number is assigned and imprinted on a metal disc; this number then travels with your loved one throughout the cremation process, ensuring that we never lose track of who is who.

We hope that this guide to cremation planning has helped you have a better grasp of the process.

Afterlife Funerals Pty Ltd is a family-owned and operated business located in the Sydney metropolitan area of New South Wales. Established in 2004 we strive to offer families a low-cost funeral service with our renowned bespoke service.

Our services include:
Cremation: https://www.afterlifefunerals.com.au/cremation-services/
Burial: https://www.afterlifefunerals.com.au/burial-services/
Prepaid: https://www.afterlifefunerals.com.au/funeral-fund-aus/

KEYWORDS: funeral director, funerals, funeral directors, funeral parlour, funeral home, cremation, cremation services, crematorium, chapel, burial, burial services, direct cremation, no service cremation, coffin, casket, funeral flowers, funeral stationery.